1968 and Beyond: The New World of Art & Photography

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Join For a New World to Come artists Ishiuchi Miyako and Kunié Sugiura in conversation with exhibition curator Yasufumi Nakamori (Museum of Fine Arts, Houston) for their insiders’ perspective on the earliest stirrings of contemporary art in Japan and New York during the late 1960s and 1970s. This artists-in-dialogue opening event will shed new light on the radical – and deeply personal – camera-based practices that drew artists and photographers to the edge of visual experimentation across the globe. Followed by an exclusive cocktail reception with the discussants.

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Music: Tokyo to New York

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The admired pianists Taka Kigawa and Judith Olson, in addition to the traditional Japanese musicians Jun Ando and Chatori Shimizu, join Thomas Piercy—equally adept at clarinet and hichiriki—in a concert that brings together works by composers from New York and Japan, including David Del Tredici, William Mayer, Ned Rorem (“Four Colors”), Jun Nagao, and Ippo Tsuboi (“Sky View Factor II”). (Tenri Cultural Institute, 43 W. 13th St. 212-645-2800. Oct. 18 at 4.)

Tenri Cultural Institute
43A W. 13th St.
New York, NY 10011
http://tenri.org/
212-645-2800

Japan’s Ramen chain Ichiran is opening in New York

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Ichiran, the ’60s-era “original red sauce” ramen chain from Fukuoka, is opening very soon.

New York’s ramen boom has grown to include two Ippudo locations, Ivan Orkin’s rye noodle installations in Hell’s Kitchen and the East Village, and twin Totto Ramen shops in recent years.

In an emailed statement, an Ichiran rep said the exact opening date was uncertain, which makes sense especially considering the nearly eight years spanning the first announcement and today’s date. A lease has been signed, but the chain is not yet ready to reveal its location.

But there’s plenty to start (cautiously) getting excited about: The chain is beloved for its singular offering, a marrow-infused, Hakata-style tonkotsu that can be ordered in varying degrees of porky flavor and bone-brothy thickness, which are actually just two categories out of five more that can be customized. Moreover, the chain is known for its partitioned boothlike seating arrangement, at which both mobile phone usage and talking are strictly forbidden.

Japanese gardens in New York

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“The rich history of Japanese gardens in New York may come as a surprise to many. New York City and surrounding areas have in fact produced more Japanese gardens than almost any part of North America,” says Dr. Kendall Brown, who is also the author of the popular book “Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America.”

Japan’s best-selling mascara is a godsend

Miaray mascara
Miaray mascara

We’ve long known that Japan is light years ahead of us in important realms like manufacturing reliable automobiles and novelty pet grooming. But there’s another key area where the Japanese have us beat: mascara. Forget Maybelline Great Lash and its ilk, with their need for special makeup remover and propensity to turn raccoonish, even when labeled waterproof. Fiberwig, the No. 1-selling mascara in Japan, just started making an upgraded formula in the US, and I’m a convert.

When I brushed it on with the curved applicator, I didn’t get clumpy lashes covered in black goo. Instead, the fiber formula layered cleanly on my lashes, thickening and elongating them dramatically. A lash-obsessed friend who drops a lot of cash on bimonthly extensions gazed at me with jealousy. When my eyes got watery at one point, it didn’t smudge. Even better, at the end of the night, I washed off my lashes with regular soap and water. Sayonara, Great Lash!

Miaray Fiberwig mascara: $18.99 at ulta.com.

Company Derashinera Spectator

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NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE

This highly conceptual multimedia dance work transports audiences back and forth between a seemingly quotidian space and an outlandish world. Inspired by a series of workshops with students from a school for the deaf in Tokyo, Spectator unveils non-narrative stories of tender emotion, woven through director/choreographer Shuji Onodera’s original movement vocabulary coupled with video imagery, projected text, an intimate apartment room stage set and slapstick humor. The cast includes Naoya Oda from the celebrated butoh company Dairakudakan along with Maki Yamada and Mai Nagumo, two participants from Onodera’s initial workshops for deaf students.

Tickets: $30/$25 Japan Society members

The Friday, November 13 performance is followed by a MetLife Meet-the-Artists Reception.

Friday, November 13, 7:30 PM
Saturday, November 14, 7:30 PM

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